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the saudis are providing virtually no assistance today to egypt. think of what is going on in jordan and egypt today. these two countries, each of whom borders the world's most resource-rich, energy-rich part of the world, today, are undergoing a rather draconian restrictions on the uses of energy. the lights are out in cairo every night at 10:00 and jordan has-rations. the live virtually right next door to saudi arabia. who are the three leaders who deserve special attention, mr. president? first, let's start with the prime minister of israel. if he gets another term as prime minister, he will be with you throughout your presidency. locked at the hip or perhaps another part of your anatomy. [laughter] your interests state to state our confidence and complementary. you don't have to love each other but you have to out -- but you have a big agenda with each other, that requires you to work together. it is very important for mr. netanyahu to work together with few. you are the great power and israel is the small power. you have a role to play in building a new relationship with him as
across north africa beginning with egypt, i've asked our speakers to limit the remarks to roughly seven minutes in order to reserve plenty of time for your questions and answers. dr. anthony and the organizers as always have provided with a series of thought-provoking questions, and as with previous panels, question cards we available to you. so first, i'd like to call on karim who is a visiting professor, and served as a great egyptian diplomat with direct experience in egypt's diplomacy towards middle east regional security, arms control and nonproliferation issues. is also a veteran of the egyptian information and political military affairs office here in washington. so it offers a unique insight into the delicate relationship new leaders find themselves maneuvering in. mr. haggag, thank you. >> thank you, and i'd like to thank the council for this opportunity. it's a pleasure to be here with you today. i'd like to focus my remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the conce
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
. and that's later. and next, egypt's new president makes a power play. [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. >> an eye for an eye, taliban style tops world headlines tonight. a suicide bomber detonated a truck full of explosives today in eastern afghanistan. three afghan civilians were killed and more than 90 people wounded. the taliban says it was retaliation for the recent execution of detainees. pakistan is suspending cell phone service m most parts of the country this weekend to prevent attacks of shiite muslims during a religious observance and militants often used phones for detonate bombs and killed more than a dozen people this week. what some are calli
from all women who are going to watch the grapevine tonight. we'll explain coming up. up next, egypt's president stands firm on the sweeping new powers. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith roastedegetab! i'm actually looking at the wo grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. at pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. >> bret: the obama adminis
>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
involved and taking sides, like egypt, friend of hamas, and the united states, which tonight is sending naval vessels offshore in case americans need to get out of there. it has been another day of explosions and air raid sirens. it remains a situation on the edge. we have two reports tonight. our richard engel is in gaza, we want to begin, though, with martin fletcher in tel aviv. >> reporter: good evening, they met on the agenda escalating in gaza and a possible ground invasion. the militants are challenging israel, by firing rockets where they never fired them before. a complete surprise, jerusalem, israel's capital, was attacked for the first time today. this picture on the internet, two rockets fired from gaza fell harmlessly outside the city. tel aviv, too, for the second time in two days in two days, the second time the rocket fell in the sea. hamas showing its back has not been broken. there is no rest for the south, either, even while burying the dead from yesterday's raid that killed three people. mourners went into panic, at yet another siren warning for yet another rocket at
, but there is an international effort under way to work on a cease-fire. egypt has been taking the lead role, and today the egyptian president, along with representatives from qatar and turkey, held talks in cairo with hamas' leader in exile. the israelis call him a terrorist, but so far, they haven't object the to the egyptians' efforts. margaret. >> brennan: allen pizzey in tel aviv. thank you. for more on the gaza conflict we're joined in washington by our senior national security analyst, juan zarate. juan, good evening. >> good evening, margaret. >> brennan: what exactly is egypt trying to accomplish? >> well, egypt is trying to broker a cease-fire here. they want the violence to stop. they also want to demonstrate that they can serve as a regional power, they can bring peace, and for the sake of president morsi and the muslem brotherhood running egypt they want to consolidate power and get the economy running. they don't want a war to be starting on their doorstep at a time when they are not in full control in cairo. >> reporter: egypt and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what k
in the north shot down a fighter jet and captured its pilot. egypt pose a political crisis is deepening. clashes erupted in cairo between police and protesters who have been occupying central tahrir square. >> they about to stay put until president morsi withdraws from power. >> he insists that his decree is necessary for national security and is only temporary. >> police used tear gas to try to disperse the crowds, but the morning after mass protests, many demonstrators vowed to stay put. critics feel cheated. they say the president's decrees go against the spirit of egypt's revolution. the opposition once he is well on his way to becoming an islamist autocrat, not a precedent for all egyptians as promised. >> what you did to us, mr. president -- you divided the country in half. shame on you. >> tuesday's demonstrations lasted well into the night. some 300,000 people flooded onto tahrir square, numbers not seen since the fall of hosni mubarak. the crisis has mobilized egypt's political opposition, who called on protesters to stay put. there have been clashes with police. one demonstrat
in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events
leadership and leadership in egypt to try and come up with a truce, one that she describes as being durable. shannon? >> shannon: we'll talk more with the panel about that, david. thank you. the violence in the middle east is stealing thunder from president obama's asian visit and interrupting outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton's farewell tour. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> secretary of state hillary clinton plunged right in to the last minute shuttle diplomacy. rushing from campodea to jerusalem. to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid. and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> after a short rest, clinton will now head to ramallah early wednesday to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm sw
egypt. my opinions in what was happening in the last two years is somewhat in comparison to what was happening in 1978 when i was there. what we are seeing now is that the u.s. has very little to do with what happened there. that the uprisings were very much from within and were very much about the economic devastation that many of the countries have experienced, and it was very much a grassroots movement. that means a signal of hope that this was something from the people themselves and not something imposed on them from outside. now i think we are a little impatient. it has only been two years. these countries have their own unique problems that we will talk about, but i think it has been two years. in the case of libya, it has been over four decades of stagnation. so expectations should be moderated based on the fact that this is a process >> let me just address this by answering the question, why were so many people surprised by the uprising and use that as an understanding of what is actually going on. we weren't actually surprised that the public -- this is something, every
troops are poised at the border, ready to move at gaza. negotiations speer headed by egypt are ongoing, and tonight the united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo, just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease-fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since it began its bombing campaign last wednesday. ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. ben, how are civilians dealing with this conflict? some of those numbers we hear, 870 people injured are frightening. >> yeah, they're not dealing very well with i
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
into the country. egypt has president is leading the talks. earlier today, he said a truce could be hours away. that didn't happen. the attacks continue now on both sides of the border. earlier today in jerusalem, air sirens, ho mass militants say they fired a rocket at the holy city just as the u.n. secretary general was arriving there for truce talks. it's but the second time hamas targeted jerusalem during this conflict. it landed outside the city. no word of any injuries. but the israeli military reports an 18-year-old soldier did die in a rocket attack today in the south of israel. he is the first israeli service member reported killed in a week of fighting. and the israelis are now firing back with air strikes. officials say this attack on a car in gaza city killed a militant and five other people. secretary clinton arrived in israel during studio b today after cutting short a trip to asia with the president. she just met with the israeli prime minister, netanyahu. officials say she'll also meet with the palestinian leader, abbas, and the egyptian president, morsey. but not with leaders
will be back to take oua look at events in egypt. >> dw in december. her beauty shrouded in a legend. nefertiti, the pharaoh's queen. her world and must boss was discovered 100 years ago. 100 years of nefertiti. the laboratory in the ice fields of the antarctic. the research station where scientists gather key data on global climate change and arctic adventures. painter, graphic artist, innovator. the greek artists of the renaissance. who was he? we look at him and his influence to this day. december on dw. all broadcast times online. >> welcome back. eu foreign finance ministers meeting to discuss the fighting in the sinai region. there have been a string of attacks in the area. >> senior secured officers said to be in critical condition after being shot over the weekend. it claimed the lives of three policemen on saturday. have grown bolder since the egyptian revolution and the attacks have been spilling over into neighboring israel. >> hundreds of tanks and heavy artillery demonstrating in northern sinai directly on the israeli border. the egyptian army looking on as it prepares for war. thi
thing in egypt. mubarak left, the pakistani egypt are different stories. the military both countries controls upwards of 40% of the country directly and the rest is a small group of elites. so that is what is the lack of big trees falling in creating the new. that gets back to your gm question. you need to have capabilities to repurpose what is released with something dies. when something old false. but there has not been enough of that in a place like pakistan or in egypt. china and egypt is a totally different sorry. >> host: philip auerswald come what do teacher at george mason? >> guest: i teach economics and social lunch premiership. i would just use regular entrepreneurship. i'm a believer in lunch premiership is a transformative force in society. social entrepreneurship of coors is about thinking how to address public challenges in miniature for new rail manner, potentially envision new ventures, new pathways to make the most of that. so a lot of folks in this book you may save our social lunch burners. it's a great teaching here. i love this environment. i've got a colleague,
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
need to help the libyans train a national army. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: ther
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
in egypt and tunisia to push this forward and to overcome the increasing polarization. >> i will add to and dan's remarks and say in terms of technicalities and specific steps that need to be taken to reconfigure the domestic security establishment, they are all laid out there in a study that was put together by a group of civil society leaders as well as a group of meetings from the securities sector, commonly known as police for egypt. there's a great deal of debate within civil society about the exact concrete actionable step that needs to be taken in the short run and in the long run some of these steps when themselves to the type of changes that would require the liberation. this is one issue to keep in mind. the dialog's ideas are out there but what is missing as dan mentioned is the political will, the seriousness to engage in dialogue on this issue, even if they're not ready to adopt policy recommendations, there needs to be some kind of ongoing dialogue on these issues but at the same time i want to point out the issue of political will is important, there will always be a c
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
and jerusalem, they're being funneled through the sudan to egypt, to gaza, to hamas. they're coming right through the sudan, and the sudan is up to their eyeballs. you've got president morsi who has been very chum my with the president of sudan. they're very tight now and the plot thickens. >> this idea that morsi of the muslim brotherhood is somehow a moderate when it comes to dealing with israel is just fanciful. the threat here is that if israel backs off from its present posture with respect to gaza, more missiles will come in from iran through sudan, and when and if israel decides to do something about the iranian nuclear weapons program, the israeli air force will be in a very difficult position because it can't be in three places at once. it can't be over iran and over gaza and over the valley trying to take out hezbollah missiles. >> of course, it was over sudan taking out the munitions factory that they believe was in iran less than a month ago. they can't be that place, either. >> right. no. i think this is a decision iran has made to demonstrate what many people have feared for
, to come before cameras in egypt and announce a period of calm. but that announcement has not happened. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so
this aggression. egypt. egypt, the revolution, will not spare any effort to stop this aggression. and achieve a sustainable truce. >> meanwhile in washington, we're joined by two guests, the award winning palestinian journalist mohammed omer, and we want to teach you for being with us, back again, thank you so much. tell us what is happening on the ground in gaza right now. >> you are welcome. let me start with -- i'm in the southern part of the gaza strip s just launched two missiles, killing one person and a person has just arrived to the hospital. he was 24 years old. that brings the number of air strikes last three days to 502. this resulted in the killing of a 23 -- killing of 23 people, most of whom more civilians. we need to talk about the humanitarian situation in the gaza strip. this is a situation targeting a population of civilians, israel is shooting in a fishbowl. there is no shelter and nowhere to run for the general population. because that is living in a very dire situation. the u.n. has decided to shut all of these schools tomorrow as well as the ministry of education, higher
of government and that our impression is that the presidency, the foreign ministry, the other agencies of egypt have worked together cohesively with in relation to hamas and to israel to try to bring about a ceasefire. so we have to support their efforts. >> dr. julian lewis. >> does the foreign secretary agree that the greater stride towards peace was when president sadat signed the treaty between egypt and israel, and does he, therefore, share my disappointment of the statement recently by president morrissey of -- morsi of egypt that the president situation is an act of aggression solely by the israelis? >> well,hile that statement is different from what he or i might say about the origins of this, nevertheless, i hope my honorable friend will bear in mind the answer i gave to the previous question about the very constructive role being played by egypt. my experience and the prime minister's experience in meeting president morsi is that he wants a peaceful future for his country, he has not turned against the peace treaty with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy an
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
to the far east speaking air force one with leaders from israel and egypt and turkey in a scramble to avoid further escalation of the violence. i welcome israel's counsel general and will israel invade gaza in >> the man date that the israel defense forces receive from the israeli government is remove the threat that is it a magnitude. and thousands of rockets that threaten and paralyze life in our count southerp region. the government gave a man date to remove and thatthis is not limited in time or in scope. it is it certainly a possibility and at this stage of the game we don't know yet. >> gaza is one of the defensest populated places. there will be more civilian casulties and don't worry about international pressure on israel. >> we enjoy legitimacy. the president of the united states expressed support in israel's right to arm itself. but we are concerned about innocent people being harmed because of the military action. and the government instructed it to minimize it as humanly possible the loss of life and damage to proper. >> i know that. and i know that israel always does that. and
that leave the quest for peace? ♪ >> jennifer: leaders from israel and gaza met in egypt today to discuss a possible drawdown with u.s. secretary general. for now, though the fighting continues. israeli air strikes killed nearly 40 people today, groups in gaza respondented by shooting nearly 100 rockets in israel. and on the israeli side of the border things appeared remarkably calm today. this picture has caused a stir online. it shows israelis watching passively as in-coming missiles sail over head. so why to israelis feel so comfortable out in the open as missiles fly above them? because of something called the iron dome. it's a defense system that uses radar to detect in-coming rockets and determine where they will land. if it is headed towards a populated area the gunner shoots the missile out of the sky. it is particularly good at detecting the smaller, older rockets that the palestinians use. iron dome has had an incredible 85% successful rate against the 300 rockets the palestinians have fired. the gulf missiles intercepted less than 10% of their target. iro
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
. >>> i'm veroniy r n egypt visitors can get a revived glimpse of history. after six years of renovations and the arab spring uprising the tomb of king tut has been reopened. the u.s. ambassador to egypt received a special tour. the events marks 90 years since the tomb was first discovered. egypt is hoping to boost tourism industry. >>> to mexico city a musical trip to the church. mariachis came together to celebrate the feast day of patron saint cecelia. they marched through the streets in jackets and sombreros before a mass and concert. the journey is carried out every year on november 22nd. >>> one south korean park teaches visitors about a different kind of throne. the park is now home to what is said to be the world's first toilet culture park. statues and educational displays teach visitors the history of toilets and raises awareness about sanitation. the park even has additional exhibits inside of a toilet-shaped building. not every day you see that. >> someone had a little too much time on their hands and money and engineering skills. >>> you don't even know what to say. >> school
president of egypt being the prime mover here, pressured by the u.s., but bringing together all sides? i'm not sure that ayman can hear us. we have a satellite delay. can we talk about the diplomacy from the standpoint of hamas and the muslim brotherhood? >> yeah. andrea, these talks have been now under the auspices of the egyptian government but more specifically under the au spis sis of intelligence officials. they can meet with israel and the palestinian factions. it's unlikely that president m mahmoud morsi was going to sit down with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some poi
between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this afternoon, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu told reporters he leaves open the possibility of a ground invasion of gaza at a later date, but agreeing to a ceasefire made sense now. >> i know there are
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